Ultimate Guide to Microsoft Outlook Search Commands – Improve Your Email Search Efficiency

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Microsoft Outlook’s search feature is quite powerful and allows users to find emails quickly using a variety of search commands or criteria. Depending on the version of Microsoft Outlook you are using the Search box is either in the Title Bar

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or at the top of the emails under the ribbon:

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Using the built-in search in Microsoft Outlook, here’s a list of useful search commands that you can use:

  1. Keywords: Simply type any word or phrase to search emails containing these in the subject, body, or sender/recipient fields.
  2. Subject: To find emails with specific words in the subject, use subject: followed by your keywords. Example: subject:meeting notes
  3. From: To find emails from a specific sender, use from: followed by the sender’s name or email address. Example: from:john.doe@example.com
  4. To: To search for emails sent to a specific person, use to: followed by the recipient’s name or email address. Example: to:jane.smith@example.com
  5. CC: To find emails where a specific person was CC’d, use cc: followed by the person’s name or email address.
  6. BCC: If you’re searching in your own mailbox and want to find emails where a specific person was BCC’d, use bcc: followed by the person’s name or email address. This only works for emails you sent.
  7. Attachments: To find emails with attachments, use hasattachments:yes
  8. Date Ranges: Use received: or sent: followed by a date range to find emails within a specific timeframe. Example: received:01/01/2024..01/31/2024
  9. Specific Date: To find emails from a specific date, use received: or sent: followed by the date. Example: received:01/15/2024
  10. Category: To find emails categorized under a specific category, use category: followed by the category name.
  11. Flagged Emails: To find emails that are flagged, use isflagged:yes
  12. Read or Unread: To find emails that are read or unread, use isread:no for unread and isread:yes for read emails.
  13. Importance: To search for emails marked with a specific importance level, use importance: followed by high, normal, or low.
  14. With Specific Words in the Body: To search for emails with specific words in the body, use body: followed by the words.
  15. Size: To find emails larger or smaller than a certain size, use size: followed by a comparison operator (>, <, =, <=, >=) and a size in kilobytes (KB) or megabytes (MB). Example: size:>500KB.

These commands can be combined to create more specific searches. For example, to find all unread emails from John Doe with attachments received in January 2024, you could use: from:john.doe@example.com hasattachments:yes received:01/01/2024..01/31/2024 isread:no

You’re now equipped with the knowledge to transform the way you manage your emails in Microsoft Outlook. But knowledge alone isn’t power—application is. We encourage you to start implementing these search commands today and see firsthand how much more efficient your email management can become.

If you found this guide helpful, don’t stop here. Contact Computer Business  for more invaluable tips and tricks that will take your productivity to new heights. Whether you’re looking to master Outlook or streamline your IT workflow, we’re here to guide you every step of the way.

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